Friday, December 31, 2010

Note to Readers: This is the last posting of devotionals from brother Philpot's book, 'Ears from Harvested Sheaves' and completes that work. I trust they have been a blessing to you.

Starting January 1st, sister Rose will begin publishing the daily devotionals from 'Through Baca's Vale' once again. To be added to her mailing list, please feel free to contact her directly at the address given above. If you prefer, you could simply go to the 'Through Baca's Vale' blog spot for your daily readings and select the one you want from the blog archive link on the left-hand side of the page.  Here's the link:  http://throughbacasvale.blogspot.com/ .

By His grace alone,
Dale

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"All flesh is as grass, and all the glory of man as the flower of grass. The grass withereth, and the flower thereof falleth away; but the word of the Lord endureth for ever. And this is the word which by the gospel is preached unto you." 1 Peter 1:24, 25

All flesh, and everything that springs from the flesh, and is connected with the flesh, is as grass, which, for a time, looks green and flourishing, but touched with the mower's scythe, or scorched by the midday sun, soon withers and fades away. Such is all flesh, without exception, from the highest to the lowest. As in nature, some grass grows thicker and longer than other, and makes, for a while, a brighter show, yet the scythe makes no distinction between the light crop and the heavy, so the scythe of death mows down with equal sweep the rich and the poor, and lays in one common grave all the children of men.

You have seen sometimes in the early spring the grass in flower, and you have noticed those little yellowish "anthers," as they are termed, which tremble at every breeze. This is "the flower of grass;" and though so inconspicuous as almost to escape observation, yet as much its flower as the tulip or the rose is the flower of the plant which bears each. Now, as the grass withereth, so the flower thereof falleth away. It never had, at its best state, much permanency or strength of endurance, for it hung as by a thread, and it required but a little gust of wind to blow it away, and make it as though it never had been. Such is all the pride of the flesh, and all the glory of man.